Workbench Weekly eTip
 

Archive for September, 2011

Seasonal Window Seal

Friday, September 30th, 2011

When it comes time to seal your windows against the cold weather, you don’t have to rely on those shrink-fit plastic insulator kits. There is a product that’s simpler to use and very effective at stopping air leaks around a window sash. It’s called removable or peelable caulk. The brand found most commonly is Seal ‘n’ Peel from Dap (Dap.com).

Seasonal Window Seal

As you can see in the Photo, above, this caulk is applied using a standard caulking gun. But it’s clear and hardly noticeable, so you can apply it between the sash and around the window perimeters without making an unsightly mess.

Seasonal Window Seal

What’s really different, though, can be seen in the Photo above. Come spring, you can just pull on the Seal ‘n’ Peel caulk to remove it. It comes out cleanly without pulling up the paint or stain or leaving any residue.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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Instant Shelf Mockup

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Before you build shelving, one easy way you can see what you’ll end up with is to mock up the layout with cardboard and paint cans. This will give you a sense of the shelves’ sizes and the spacing you’ll need between shelves.

Cleaning Air Ducts

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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Super-Simple Wire Chase

Friday, September 16th, 2011
Cleaning Air Ducts

Running wire from one story of your home to the next doesn’t require fancy electrician tools. You can take a 10-ft. length of ½" PVC pipe, insert and tap wire inside it, and push it up through a hole drilled in the wall base plate. The PVC is flexible enough to bend when needed, but rigid enough to work its way through the wall’s interior to the desired destination. Once the wire is in place, have one person hold onto it while a helper removes the PVC pipe.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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The Great Debate: Cleaning Air Ducts

Friday, September 9th, 2011

Indoor air pollution is a growing concern for homeowners, especially those who suffer from allergies. There’s much debate about whether dirty air ducts have a significant impact on the amount of dust in homes, and if cleaning the ducts can help prevent health problems. According to the EPA, a small amount of dust in the ducts is normal. Dust may also collect on return registers and isn’t necessarily a sign of badly contaminated ducts.

Cleaning Air Ducts

The EPA recommends that you clean air ducts only on an as-needed basis rather than routinely. Be wary of providers who recommend regular cleanings as part of your system’s maintenance, or those who make broad claims about the health benefits their service provides.

You may want to look into duct cleaning, however, if you can see mold growth inside the ducts. Keep in mind that cleaning might not get to the root of the problem. You must first determine what is causing the mold and correct it, or the mold will most likely return. Other potential reasons for duct cleaning include large amounts of dust coming from supply registers or vermin infestation.

Some companies will even offer to sanitize your HVAC system with chemicals. Make sure you’re fully informed before agreeing to the use of chemicals during the cleaning process. Visit the EPA’s Web site (EPA.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html) for more information about the process.

If you would like to have your ducts cleaned, ensure that the service provider is qualified. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA.com) member search can help you locate a professional in your area. Before you hire a company, compare estimates and services from different providers in your area.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)
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Easy Case Assembly

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

When installing shelves in a case, it’s easy to drill pilot holes in the wrong place and miss the shelf completely. That’s why you might want to consider creating this U-shaped jig. One arm bears on the shelf from inside, so it indicates where to drill pilot holes on the outside of the case.

Mobile Extension Ladder

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (16 votes, average: 3.75 out of 5)
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