Workbench Weekly eTip
 

Archive for August, 2011

Mobile Extension Ladder

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Extension ladders can be heavy and awkward to move around. But you can make things easier by adding a pair of wheels to yours. These wheels, which came off an old fertilizer spreader, pass through one of the open rungs of the ladder. They just need to be mounted so they don’t contact the ground when the ladder is lifted into place.

Mobile Extension Ladder

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (6 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)
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Revamp a Lamp for 3-Way Bulbs

Friday, August 19th, 2011

If you ever want to convert a standard table lamp to work with 3-way light bulbs, the process if fairly straightforward. Start by examining the bulb socket in your existing lamp to determine if it’s made of metal or plastic. Most are metal with a gold or silver finish.

Then you can pick up a new socket of the same type at any hardware store or home center. Just be sure it’s marked “three way” or “three position.”

3-Way Bulbs

To replace a common metal socket, first unplug the lamp. Then pop the socket apart by squeezing it and pulling it off the base. This will expose the wires. If the wires are screwed to the socket, simply unscrew them. If the wires are inserted into holes in the socket instead, you’ll have to cut the wires, and then strip about ½" of insulation off the ends.

Now just wire in the new socket, as shown at left. One of the wires on the lamp cord will either have a stripe or texture. Connect that to the gold screw. Attach the other wire to the silver screw. Then just push the new socket into the socket base on the lamp, and you’re set for three-way lighting.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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No-Guess Picture Positioning

Friday, August 12th, 2011

Tired of guessing at the location when installing picture hangers on the wall? You can use a thumbtack and a piece of masking tape to end the guesswork. By positioning the frame and pushing the tack into the wall, you get a precise hole for mounting a hanger.

Picture Positioning

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (6 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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Special Hinge Simplifies Cabinetry

Friday, August 5th, 2011

Most hinges have two flaps that lie flat against one another when the hinge is closed. So if you mount the hinge flush with the door and the cabinet, you’ll end up with a rather large gap in between.

That’s why hinges are often set into recesses called mortises. These get cut into the door and the frame to match the size of the hinge flaps. That way, part of each flap is “buried” when the hinge gets mounted, so the gap between the door and frame is smaller.

No-mortise Hinge

Thankfully, there’s a type of hinge that doesn’t require a mortise. In fact, it’s known as a no-mortise hinge. As you can see in the Photo above, a no-mortise hinge has one small flap that fits into an opening in the other, larger flap. That means there’s one flap thickness when the door is closed, which produces just the right amount of gap between the door and the cabinet.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)
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