Workbench Weekly eTip
 

Archive for December, 2009

Socket Savvy

Friday, December 25th, 2009

Some bolt heads are so thin that it’s difficult for the rounded ends of most sockets (near right) to get a grip on them. In these cases, one solution is to grind off the end of the socket on a bench grinder. This produces a flat surface that fits tightly on the bolt (far right).

Sockets

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (10 votes, average: 4.40 out of 5)
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Wax Away a Dull Finish

Friday, December 18th, 2009

While a scratch is readily apparent, lost sheen is a more subtle finish flaw. But over time, the finish on a frequently used piece of furniture will gradually begin to fade from glossy to dull.

Wax On, Wax Off: A little paste wax is sometimes all that’s needed to revive the finish.

Step 1

Step 1: Load a “0000” (very fine) steel wool pad with wax, and rub in the direction of the grain.

Step 2

Step 2: Use a clean, dry cloth to buff out the wax, rubbing in a circular motion.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (12 votes, average: 3.42 out of 5)
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Stop Clamps from Slipping

Friday, December 11th, 2009
"Quick-grip" clamps

"Quick-grip" clamps aren’t so quick when the jaw slips all the way open. An easy solution for this is to put a rare-earth magnet on the clamp bar to act as a stop for the adjustable jaw.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.38 out of 5)
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Smoother Walls Step-by-Step

Friday, December 4th, 2009

Painting Walls

One common mistake people make when rolling on paint is trying to fill in too large of an area with a single loaded roller. Inevitably, one side of the area will end up oversaturated with paint, while the other side gets barely covered.

To prevent this, try rolling in smaller 3-ft. to 4-ft. wide squares. Just cut in the smaller section with a brush first. Then load the roller by pulling a line of paint from the paint pan reservoir and moving it back and forth to coat the roller.

Now make overlapping strokes, completely unloading the roller in the smaller section before moving on to the next. The result is more uniform paint coverage across the entire wall.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers
Online Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 4.40 out of 5)
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