Workbench Weekly eTip
 

Archive for March, 2009

Store Material with a Ladder Rack

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Rather than taking your worn-out extension ladder to the dump, you can turn it into a multi-purpose rack. The rungs provide a handy place to store freshly painted moldings while they dry. It can also be used on a jobsite for temporary lumber storage.

To make the rack, cut both sections of an extension ladder into two equal lengths. Make sure the rungs align, and then drill holes and bolt the pieces together to form a couple of A-frame stands. Tie each A-frame together around the top rungs with zip ties to provide additional stability. The rack can be disassembled and stored when not in use.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers

Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (10 votes, average: 3.70 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...


Miter Saw Mobile Base

Friday, March 20th, 2009

Miter saw stands, for all their capacity, stability, and versatility, often lack mobility. To solve that problem on our own miter saw stand, we built a simple mobile base to hold the legs of the stand (Photo).

The base is just a plywood box with a wheel on each end. Locate the wheels so the base is raised just enough to provide adequate clearance off the floor.

Hex bolts, secured with lock nuts, serve as axles. The nuts sit in a counterbore drilled in each end piece. That way they won’t interfere with the stand’s legs. To move the saw, just lift up the end opposite the base and roll the stand like a wheelbarrow.

Because the base isn’t permanently attached, the stand can be removed easily for storage.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers

Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (14 votes, average: 3.36 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...


Quick & Easy Toilet Repair

Friday, March 13th, 2009

If your toilet keeps running, that’s because the flapper valve isn’t closing properly. This valve is simply a stopper that covers the opening between the tank and bowl (Illustration). When you push the flush lever, a chain lifts the flapper, allowing water to flow into the bowl. As the water level falls, the flapper falls over the opening, and water pressure holds it closed. Eventually, the flapper gets worn, preventing it from forming a good seal.

To replace the flapper, first shut off the water supply, and flush the toilet to drain the tank. Pop the flapper off its pivot, and unhook the chain. Take the flapper with you to the store to make sure you get the right replacement. Then install the new one by reversing the removal procedures.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers

Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 3.29 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...


How to Fix a Stuck Garbage Disposal

Friday, March 6th, 2009

Garbage disposals are equipped with an overload feature. It shuts off the power to prevent the motor from burning up if it gets jammed. To get the disposal working, you need to clear whatever is caught between the impellers and shredder (Illustration, right) and then reset the overload switch.

To fix the disposal, start by unplugging the power cord. Now turn the motor by hand using the service wrench that fits into the bottom of the unit. Turn the wrench back and forth until you free the obstruction. Use a flashlight to look into the disposal. If necessary, use tongs — never your hand — to remove the obstruction.

With the jam cleared, press the reset button. Make sure the switch is off, plug the disposal back in, and then turn it on. If it jams again, repeat these procedures.

Have a nice weekend,

Wyatt Myers

Editor, Workbench

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 3.20 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...




Subscribe to Workbench eTips

Archives

© 2014 August Home Publishing Company
Magazine Customer Service - Privacy Policy - Terms of Use - Contact Us
Entries (RSS)